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The development of arts and cities was genetically determined

The development of arts and cities was genetically determined

Researchers at the University of Chicago claim that the human brain has not yet reached the end of its evolution. Right, we do not know yet what genetic configuration will have the brain of the future superhuman potential, but the researchers assure us that the evolution of humanity over the last 40,000 years has been determined by the intelligent mutations of two genes: MCPH1 and ASPM. These genes are generally responsible for modulating brain size.

Researchers at the University of Chicago claim that the human brain has not yet reached the end of its evolution. Right, we do not know yet what genetic configuration will have the brain of the future superhuman potential, but the researchers assure us that the evolution of humanity over the last 40,000 years has been determined by the intelligent mutations of two genes: MCPH1 and ASPM. These genes are generally responsible for modulating brain size.
Researchers believe that these genes suffer, from time to time, a mutation that makes them more efficient. Two studies were conducted. One of them, on a lot of 90 people and a chimpanzee, and the other, on a lot of 1200 people. The researchers analyzed the structure of the respective genes in all these subjects and tried to establish an evolutionary route of the successive mutations.

It was discovered, mainly, a significant mutation for each of the two genes. Thus, MCPH1 appears to have undergone a mutation about 37,000 years ago, coinciding with the emergence of arts and crafts in human civilizations. ASPM revealed its mutagenic intelligence later, that is, almost 6,000 years ago. This moment coincides, surprisingly, with the advent of writing and the development of urban centers.
From a statistical point of view, among the volunteers studied, 30% had ASPM mutation and 70% MCPH1 mutation. Both mutations were more frequent in representatives of European populations (including those descending from European populations) and those of southern Asia.
The researchers do not specify, for example, if the volunteers who did not present the ASPM mutation were illiterate and unable to live in cities, but the research in this area is just beginning.
Source: www.observ─âtormedical.ro