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Genital warts, a sign of the risk of uterine cancer

Genital warts, a sign of the risk of uterine cancer


The appearance of genital warts, also called condylomas or venereal vegetation, is a consequence of the presence in the body of papillomaviruses, which can cause cervical cancer.
There are partners who have the virus, but it does not manifest itself.
Genital warts are prominent, painless, skin-colored, usually small in size and appear on or around the sexual organs, isolated or united in formations. I do not give itching, unless they make complications. They can occur within a week or even a few months after contact with the infection and are accidentally discovered.
They are transmitted only sexually
The venereal vegetation is transmitted only by sexual means, not through the toilet or otherwise, says Dr. Anca Teodor, dermato-venerologist at the Colentina Clinic Hospital in Bucharest.
Manifestations and location of genital warts vary by sex. In men, these warts do not pose special problems. In women, when the papillomavirus is located in the cervix, there is a risk of cancer.
Papillomavirus can be detected with a special test, and the Pap test and colposcopy detect cancer early.
In pregnant women, these warts grow faster
In pregnant women, the venereal vegetation evolves faster due to the immune effort that the body makes during pregnancy, and the treatment must be adapted to the situation, explains Dr. Iuliana Ceausu, gynecologist at the Cantacuzino Hospital in the Capital.
It is important to treat all partners, otherwise re-infection occurs. If the body's immunity is not very good, the warts can heal, but the virus can remain.
The progression of papillomavirus-induced lesions to cancer occurs over time, says Dr. Ceausu. There are several methods of wart destruction: with chemical substances (contraindicated in pregnant women), physical - by applying liquid nitrogen -, by electrocautery or by immunity enhancement therapy.
The presence of this condition is a favorable factor for other sexually transmitted diseases, including syphilis, Dr. Teodor explains.
Source: The Event of the Day