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Counterfeit medicines explode on the Internet

Counterfeit medicines explode on the Internet

The pharmaceutical company Pfizer draws attention to the phenomenon of marketing "second-hand" medicines and the danger represented by the consumption of drugs from unauthorized sources, RomNET informs. It is recommended to buy the treatments prescribed by doctors only from pharmacies as the only ones authorized. According to the international experience of the company, medicines purchased either through the Internet or from other sources, represent a health hazard. In the overwhelming majority of cases, the tablets are counterfeit and the content is harmful, in some cases even lethal.

The pharmaceutical company Pfizer draws attention to the phenomenon of marketing "second-hand" medicines and the danger represented by the consumption of drugs from unauthorized sources, RomNET informs. It is recommended to buy the treatments prescribed by doctors only from pharmacies as the only ones authorized. According to the international experience of the company, medicines purchased either through the Internet or from other sources, represent a health hazard. In the overwhelming majority of cases, the tablets are counterfeit and the content is harmful, in some cases even lethal.
This is possible because these illegally traded products do not go through the usual process of rigorous verification by the authorities of the content, quality, of the manufacturing process, which any authorized and legally traded medicine goes through.

And in Romania, the headlines of small advertising in newspapers abound with ads on "opportunities" to buy branded drugs. Any owner of an electronic mailbox is invaded, sooner or later, also offers from strangers. The Western press periodically draws attention to the dangers to which people who resort to "bargains" are exposed when it comes to medicines and discloses grave details about their production chain. There is nothing to suggest that in a care-free room in the industrial area, counterfeit pills can be made from Viagra. But this is the truth found by reporters in the British Sunday Telegraph.
In Egypt, Thailand, Colombia, India, in such clandestine factories, fake pills are lined with dirty plastic strips and then hand-painted in the famous blue color, possibly in a mixer used during the day for cement. Only in the UK last year were registered several tens of thousands of cases of people who bought online counterfeit pills at half price. Viagra is the most sound example of counterfeit medicine, a problem that is becoming global, according to Naeem Ahmed, head of the information service of the British Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA).
Since 2004, four considerable shipments of counterfeit medicines have been discovered in the UK. The most famous drugs are targeted, which have a market of billions of euros. Fakes are made in spite of any hygiene or scrupulous conditions of human life. John Theriault, Pfizer's vice president for security, revealed the Sunday Telegraph details of a descent into a Colombian factory in 2004. Located in the capital city, the factory was producing boric acid drugs mixed with brick dust.
The original color was obtained with the paint of road markings, and for the gloss the floor wax was used, recalls Theriault. 800,000 tablets were confiscated. Another action, initiated by undercover agents of the Pfizer company, managed to confiscate in 2001, in Thailand, a quantity of 2 million pills counterfeited by Viagra and Valium, as well as the manufacturing and packaging equipment. Everything started from an offer on Viagra online at a reduced price. The Sunday Telegraph claims that counterfeit drugs are produced in Egypt, in unsanitary conditions.
"The products are made from whatever comes in handy people," says John Theriault. "It's not about counterfeit bags or jeans, but about human lives," said Naeem Ahmed, MHRA's head of intelligence.
In the UK there have been four arrests in the last 6 months for the sale of counterfeit drugs over the internet. The World Health Organization estimates that between 8-10% of medicines used worldwide are counterfeit. The situation is much more serious in third world countries.
An Interpol report from last year shows that, in the case of Nigeria, the percentage is up to 60-80%. In China, about 100,000 people die every year from counterfeit drugs.
Source: Roman Chronicle